Tag Archives: Inflation

Other Coverage Modifications

Coinsurance \alpha is the fraction of losses covered by the policy.  For example, \alpha = 0.8 means if a loss is incurred, 80% will be paid by the insurance company.  A claims limit u is the maximum amount that will be paid.  The order in which coinsurance, claims limits, and deductibles is applied to a loss is important and will be specified by the problem.  The expected payment per loss when all three are present in a policy is given by

E\left[Y\right] = \alpha \left[E\left[X\wedge u\right] - E\left[X \wedge d\right]\right]

where Y is the payment variable and X is the original loss variable.  The second moment is given by

E\left[Y^2\right] = \alpha^2\left(E\left[(X\wedge u)^2\right] - E\left[(X \wedge d)^2\right]-2d\left(E\left[X \wedge u\right]-E\left[X \wedge d\right]\right)\right)

The second moment can be used to find the variance of payment per loss.  If inflation r is present, multiply the second moment by (1+r)^2 and divide u and d by (1+r).   For payment per payments, divide the expected values by P(X>d) or 1-F(d).

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Filed under Coinsurance, Coverage Modifications, Deductibles, Limits

The Loss Elimination Ratio

If you impose a deductible d on an insurance policy that you’ve written, what fraction of expected losses do you eliminate from your expected liability?  This is measured by the Loss Elimination Ratio LER(d).

\displaystyle LER(d) = \frac{E\left[X \wedge d\right]}{E\left[X\right]}

Definitions:

  1. Ordinary deductible d— The payment made by the writer of the policy is the loss X minus the deductible d.  If the loss is less than d, then nothing is paid.
  2. Franchise deductible d_f—  The payment made by the writer of the policy is the complete amount of the loss X if X is greater than d_f.
A common type of question considers what happens to LER if an inflation rate r increases the amount of all losses, but the deductible remains unadjusted.  Let X be the loss variable.  Then Y=(1+r)X is the inflation adjusted loss variable.  If losses Y are subject to deductible d, then
\begin{array}{rll} \displaystyle LER_Y(d) &=& \frac{E\left[(1+r)X\wedge d\right]}{E\left[(1+r)X\right]} \\ \\ \displaystyle &=&\frac{(1+r)E\left[X\wedge \frac{d}{1+r}\right]}{(1+r)E\left[X\right]} \\ \\ &=& \frac{E\left[X \wedge \frac{d}{1+r}\right]}{E\left[X\right]}\end{array}
Memorize:
\displaystyle E\left[X \wedge d\right] = \int_0^d{x f(x) dx} + d\left(1-F(x)\right)

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Filed under Coverage Modifications, Deductibles